There are several types of affiliate programs. Most will pay you a flat rate or percentage of the sale you make (pay-per-sale). Another common type is when you're paid per action or lead. For example, if you refer someone who signs up for businesses free trial, the business pays you for the sign-up. Although not seen as often anymore, some will pay you per click (this is seen most in contextual ad programs such as Google Adsense) or per impression (each time the ad is loaded on your website).

The benefits of affiliate marketing are location independence and the ability choose which products to promote. Also, your investment of time and energy directly correlates to the return you see. Depending on your availability and what you hope to gain from the enterprise, you can choose to be the type of marketer who sets up shop and passively waits for customers to come, or you can proactively spread the word about your favorite merchandise from prominent brand affiliates.
An affiliate marketing program is a lot of work, and in most situations there's a lot of competition so you're not going to be bringing in money immediately. Business owners and entrepreneurs suppose that all you need do is setup a site and choose an affiliate to associate with and then just let it run its course. But according to Three Ladders Marketing, only 0.6% of affiliate marketers surveyed have been in the game since 2013. That means that affiliate marketing takes time and effort to build and make money.
New affiliates who just learned what the letters S, E and O mean when put together develop a maniacal desire for links to their website. To satisfy their new addiction they go to the Internet’s dark alleys searching for a magical link elixir. Some of these probably work, but I take the position that you never want to bet against Google. Anything that works will get popular and anything abusive and popular will get squashed. The short-term boost that these bad links may provide will be erased by the time it takes to chase them. Don’t chase bad links. Instead, focus on nurturing one to two great links and building out your content.
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Mistake #3: Giving your friend’s product a glowing review without actually being familiar with your friend’s product. This happens a lot in the affiliate marketing (and book marketing) world unfortunately. It’s a “scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours” type of situation. By all means, give your friend a glowing review, but if you haven’t actually read their book or taken their course or tried their product, don’t talk about it as though you have. Readers deserve honest recommendations! (Here’s an example of me helping to announce the launch of my friend’s book while being clear I hadn’t read it.)

Doesn't work. One guy. Defensive and evasive responses. Can't use email while traveling to respond? Really? No smart phone? Instead of a demonstration on his end to prove the program works, he kept suggesting OS updates, All of which slowed my computer down to LA rush hour traffic. I deleted the program. The links to the software disappeared with note saying your order has been reversed. Now he says he'll leave it up to pay pal.
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