Don’t exhaust all the information about the product with your link. Offer enough information to your readers so they know what the link is, but I don’t recommend giving too much detail on your own site for a two reasons. First, product information, like price, often changes. If you mention the price on your site and someone clicks over and finds a different price, it’s confusing. Second, many times, the product details and features are better explained by the makers of the product. It’s best to stick to your own experience on your site.
For example, the content on Super Weddings is useful whether you're organizing a wedding today or next year. All the content on the site is created accordingly. To make things easier for the audience, it is separated into categories to make it very convenient for the reader to find what they're looking for. This, of course, is also very good for SEO. 
Decide how you'll promote the affiliate products. As mentioned, the easiest way is through a website or blog. Other successful affiliate marketers set up a squeeze page designed to build an email list, and then promote affiliate products to subscribers. Of course, your list should provide other non-sales information as people don't want to be sold all the time. Some affiliate marketers don't use a website at all, and instead use social media such as Facebook, Instagram or Twitter. Many affiliate marketers use a combination of several marketing tactics.
Take advantage of affiliate program freebies when available. Many affiliate programs provide free printables, guides, webinars or other lead magnets designed to get potential customers in their sales funnel. As an affiliate, you can share these freebies with your audience using your affiliate link so if they eventually make a purchase, you’ll earn a commission, but if they don’t they still get value upfront.
Contact the company directly. If you use a product or service and want to recommend it but you can’t find evidence of an affiliate program, consider approaching them and asking if they are willing to set one up (maybe with your help). Highlight your audience and the value of your recommendation. Explain that an affiliate program is simply rewarding happy customers (you!) for promoting, and they don’t have to pay until a sale is made.
Some good tips. I fully agree that it’s all about trust and it is always good to recommend an affiliate product that you have actually used. Why risk your reputation on a product you don’t know if it’s any good or not? If people buy one dodgy product from your site, they will probably never make that mistake again. That it why my blog strongly advocates ethical affiliate marketing. It’s the best long term stragey for affiliate marketing success.
A lot of really awesome tools on this list. A few that I wasn't aware of that I can now add to my arsenal. I've come across a really great tool for anyone that uses a lot of different channels for paid marketing, called Funnel (funnel.io). It eliminates all the tedious time that it takes to aggregate all of your spending data. They currently support integration with more than 400 advertising sources and you can either use their built-in dashboards for analysis or export to a data warehouse, BI tool, or even Google. It's an amazing time saver for anyone who has ever spent an insane amount of time gathering data that seems to be outdated even by the time you've gotten it all together. Might make a nice addition to the list!
This is another program doing much the same as the previous two, but it has a few unique aspects that put it on this list above the hordes of others. Particularly, it comes in many forms; a web interface, a stand-alone browser, a windows or mac executable or even a paid version. In a fit of goodwill, the paid version – costing $30 for the cheapest version – comes with a huge warning to try the free version before buying. It also warns of a lack of refund policy, so buyer beware.
Use your personal words & experience with the product. Your own content, or photos & videos of yourself using the product are always the most effective. For example, many affiliate programs provide swipe copy to their affiliates which is pre-written emails, post material or social media posts. These can be helpful as a guide, but they often scream swipe copy, aren’t written in your voice (the one your readers know!) and if a lot of affiliates are using it, are overdone.
Mistake #3: Giving your friend’s product a glowing review without actually being familiar with your friend’s product. This happens a lot in the affiliate marketing (and book marketing) world unfortunately. It’s a “scratch my back and I’ll scratch yours” type of situation. By all means, give your friend a glowing review, but if you haven’t actually read their book or taken their course or tried their product, don’t talk about it as though you have. Readers deserve honest recommendations! (Here’s an example of me helping to announce the launch of my friend’s book while being clear I hadn’t read it.)

For another thing, the Internet has somewhere in the neighborhood of two decades worth of traffic bot programs littering the digital ground. Some have gone through upwards of a dozen name changes and rebrands, moving from one site to another. They disappear, leaving existing users in the lurch, never to receive support or updates when the program stops working. Then identical software comes out under a new name, charging anywhere from $5 to $250, scamming people out of their cash with the same back-end software.
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